Insulin Administration

For insulin therapy to be safe and effective, patient adherence to specific preparation and injection routines is required. Patient education should include product specific storage, injection technique, accurate dosages, and site rotation.

Storage:

Education:

Administration

Insulin is rapidly broken down in the gastrointestinal tract, it cannot be taken orally. Therefore, insulin medications must be administered parenterally, with the exception of Afrezza®, which must be inhaled.

When injected, insulin should be delivered into the deep subcutaneous fat. It is recommended that the same anatomical area be used for injections given at the same time of day. The exact site should be changed systematically to utilize the entire area. In type-1 adults, the abdominal wall is the preferred site for mealtime injections. An extended profile of action can be obtained when type-1 adults inject long acting suspensions like NPH in the thigh rather than the arm or abdominal wall.

There are a variety of insulin delivery devices available today. The typical device is a disposable U-100 syringe and needle. Syringe sizes range from .25cc to 1cc. Needle length can be 5/16 or 1/2 inch. Selection of needle length should be based upon injection site. Needle angle should enter the skin at 90o for adults and 45o for thin adults and children.

Optimal compliance with the ordered insulin regimen may require more than one type of delivery device. Alternatives to the needle and syringe include:

Device appropriate disposal containers are part of a complete insulin regimen.


Instant Feedback:

When mixing insulins, the longer acting insulin preparation should be drawn up first into the syringe.
True
False

Instant Feedback:

The place on the body where insulin is injected affects insulin absorption.
True
False


©2014 RnCeus.com