Insulin and Food Sources

The hormone insulin is essential for the use and storage of nutrients. Insulin promotes nutrient storage and inhibits use of stored energy sources. Insulin promotes the entry of glucose into cells, stimulates glycogen formation in the liver and in muscle cells, and increases triglyceride formation by adipose tissue and liver. Without insulin, glucose production by the liver (gluconeogenesis) is accelerated and the breakdown of liver and muscle glycogen into glucose (glycogenolysis) occurs. This causes blood glucose levels to increase. The effects of counter regulatory hormones such as glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, epinephrine, and norepinepherine block the effects of insulin.

Instant Feedback:
The effects of insulin are increased with the action of counter regulatory hormones.

True
False


The introduction of oral anti-diabetes medications, combination insulin regimens, and the use of self-blood glucose monitoring have improved the patient's ability to manage their disease and enhanced their quality of life. Self-blood glucose monitoring in particular has improved treatment safety and allowed more dietary flexibility. Compared to earlier recommendations, today’s diabetic diet is higher in carbohydrates and lower in protein. Although many studies have focused on the role of specific nutrients, foods, or food groups in disease prevention or health promotion, research suggests that health benefits rely on food patterns that include a variety of foods. In other words, a healthy diet contains moderate servings of fruits and vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, fish, poultry, and lean meats. The current nutritional guidelines of the American Diabetes Association (ADA) are consistent with those of the American Heart Association, the National Cancer Institute, and U.S. dietary guidelines.

Instant Feedback:
Diabetic diets used today are lower in carbohydrates than those used in the past.

True
False

Dietary Components of Food

 


Instant Feedback:
Starches in the form of potatoes and cereals are polysaccharides.

True
False



RnCeus Homepage | Course catalog | Discount prices | Login | Nursing jobs | Help
© RnCeus.com 2014