Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

ADHD is more common in individuals with Down syndrome than it is in the general population. Standard medications for ADHD are generally effective in adults with Down syndrome, along with behavioral intervention, appropriate supervision, and strategies such as activity schedules and visual reminders.


INSTANT FEEDBACK:
Attention deficits and hyperactivity are part of the behaviors normally associated with Down syndrome, and medications are not appropriate for these individuals.
True
False


Autistic Disorders

Autism is diagnosed in 5-10% of people with Down syndrome, compared to only 0.13% of the general population. Nurses can be instrumental in obtaining behavioral services for these clients, as well as respite care to relieve caregivers.


INSTANT FEEDBACK:
Autism is more common in people with Down syndrome than it is in the general population, and behavioral services or respite care may be very helpful.
True
False

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

People with intellectual disabilities are often noted to have significant traits of perfectionism: their need for routine and dislike of change will cause them to be very regimented. The compulsions that someone with OCD suffers from may be mistaken for this perfectionism. (Hudak, J. 2015)

Although obsessions are rare in individuals with Down syndrome, compulsive behaviors occur more often. Some compulsive behaviors, such as manipulating straws or stuffed animals, are relatively harmless. Others, such as hair-pulling or continual hand-rubbing, can cause damage to the hair or skin.

 


INSTANT FEEDBACK:
Compulsive behaviors are to be expected as a normal part of Down syndrome, and it’s best to use selective ignoring when the adult acts compulsively.
True
False

Depression

Adults with Down syndrome show somewhat different symptoms of depression than non-disabled adults. The following symptoms are often associated with depression in adults with Down syndrome:

Because adults with Down syndrome often develop depression after a loss, it’s important for nurses to assess for symptoms in patients following the death of a family member, change in roommates, retirement of a caregiver, or other loss-related events. Since depression can cause many symptoms indicative of Alzheimer’s disease, it’s important to carefully report symptoms and changes in behavior to the client’s primary health care provider. Standard antidepressant medications, including SSRI’s, are used in adults with Down syndrome.


INSTANT FEEDBACK:
Adults with Down syndrome often shows signs of depression following a change in roommates, retirement of a caregiver, or the death of a family member.
True
False